Community News Creek cleanup1

Published on April 10th, 2016 |

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105 volunteers help clean up trash from Peachtree, Tanyard creeks

It was obvious from the “Sweep The Hooch” cleanups Saturday along both Peachtree and Tanyard creeks that more than sewage is dumped into the waterways that flow through Tanyard Creek

 Four young women with Home Depot helping with the 2016 Sweep the Hooch cleanup event at Peachtree Creek at Atlanta Memorial Park are, left to right Jackie Guerrero, Jocelyn Mendoza, Faith Elyse and Yarinette Ero.

Four young women with Home Depot helping with the 2016 Sweep the Hooch cleanup event at Peachtree Creek at Atlanta Memorial Park. From left, Jackie Guerrero, Jocelyn Mendoza, Faith Elyse and Yarinette Ero.

Park and Atlanta Memorial Park on their way to the Chattahoochee River. It’s also trash, and lots of it.

Atlanta Memorial Park Conservancy Executive Director Catherine Spillman told BuckheadView, “We filled 185 trash bags with debris, removed 41 tires from the creek (wow!), including a chemical drum among other sometimes surprising items from the creek.”

Spillman provided a number of photos of some of the 60 volunteers who showed up for AMPC’s event that tied in with the Chattahoochee Riverkeeper organization’s annual “Sweep The Hooch” event.

Upstream along Tanyard Creek, which flows into Peachtree Creek at Atlanta Memorial Park, Collier Hillls neighborhood resident Katherine Montgomery, who helped organize the cleanup in that part of the basin, told BuckheadView, they had “45 volunteers who filled approximately 160 trash bags.”

She said they had a number of miscellaneous items including: sheet metal, sports balls, fence posts, pipe, safety cones, luggage, real estate signs, silt fence, brooms, drainage pipe, wicker table, futon cushion, skate board, shovel head, car parts, mini blinds, tree irrigation bags and more.

“A number of the volunteers commented on how surprised they were at the amount of flushable wipes,” Montgomery told BuckheadView.

“Plastic bags used to be the most prevalent item seen during the creek clean-ups, now flushable wipes take the top spot,” Montgomery said. “I think it

Doug Carlton (foreground) and Russell Bell pulling apart and removing a futon cushion from Tanyard Creek.

Doug Carlton (foreground) and Russell Bell pulling apart and removing a futon cushion from Tanyard Creek.

was eye-opening to them to see where flushable wipes can end up.  Even though they may be labeled as biodegradable, they are not degrading quickly.”

Montgomery told BuckheadView partners in the cleanup included the city of Atlanta Parks Department, which is picking up the trash, Sweep The Hooch organization and City Councilwoman Yolanda Adrean, who offered to cover the neighborhood’s out-of-pocket expenses. The Sweep the Hooch organizers managed online registration and provided quite a bit of supplies as well (gloves, trash bags, first aid kits, water coolers, signs).

Downstream, the AMPC event drew volunteers not only from the surrounding neighborhoods and the Chattahoochee Riverkeeper members “but we also had two groups – Home Depot and Novelis – that came out and did an amazing job cleaning up today,” Spillman said.

The husband of the Riverkeeper organization’s Tammy Bates, also helped out with the AMPC event.

Spillman emailed Bates: “I really enjoyed working alongside your husband today.  Please let him know that I hope he’ll choose to stay with our site every year.  He’s a great motivator – 41 tires is an impressive number!”

 

 

The organizers of the Tanyard Creek cleanup were, left to right, Katie Tolleson (Collier Hills North), Katharine & Andrew Montgomery (Collier Hills Civic Assoc), Doug Carleton (Cushman & Wakefield)

The organizers of the Tanyard Creek cleanup were, left to right, Katie Tolleson (Collier Hills North), Katharine & Andrew Montgomery (Collier Hills Civic Assoc), Doug Carleton (Cushman & Wakefield)

 

 

 

 

 

 

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    One Response to 105 volunteers help clean up trash from Peachtree, Tanyard creeks

    1. There’s a problem: we need to stop flushing items not designed to be flushed.

      INDA is collaborating with manufacturers, wastewater agencies and communities to build awareness about safe disposal practices.

      Roughly 90% of the items found in sewage pump inlet screens are not designed to be flushed including paper towels, napkins, baby wipes, feminine hygiene products, and household wipes.

      The real issue is that we are flushing many products not designed to be flushed.

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