City Government NC protest bill

Published on April 5th, 2016 |

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Reed bans publicly-paid city employee travel to NC due to new law

Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed has banned all “non-essential, publicly-funded” travel by city employees to North Carolina because of that state’s controversial new law involving the LGBT community that would void a Charlotte law which allowed transgender people to choose which bathrooms they use.

Mayor Kasim Reed vetoes resolution to force city to clean up sewage in creeks and parks.

Mayor Kasim Reed vetoes resolution to force city to clean up sewage in creeks and parks.

The North Carolina bill has come under heavy fire, including a lawsuit filed last week. It was passed in a last-minute legislative session and voids all laws at the city and county level that ban employers from discriminating based on sexual orientation or gender.

The North Carolina law was passed after the city of Charlotte was set to enforce a new law protecting LGBT and transgender workers. That state law was framed as a fight against men in women’s bathrooms and vice versa, as the Charlotte law would have allowed transgender people to choose which bathrooms they use.

“As a result of [N.C.] Gov. Pat McCrory’s decision to sign discriminatory and unnecessary legislation into law, effective today I am directing all city departments to stop non-essential, publicly-funded employee travel to the state of North Carolina,” said Reed in a statement late Monday afternoon.

“I extend my support to Charlotte Mayor Jennifer Roberts, who worked to enhance protections for the city’s LGBT population, as well as to the LGBT residents of North Carolina,” Reed said. “Every person, regardless of their gender, gender expression or sexuality is a valued member of our community.”

The ACLU is suing North Carolina over the new law. “The law is intolerable and puts the most vulnerable among us at risk of discrimination, harassment and violence,” the ACLU said in a statement.

Reed’s move comes a week after Gov. Nathan Deal announced that he would veto a law recently passed by the Georgia General Assembly that would have allowed faith-based groups to refuse services or terminate employees based on sexual orientation.

 

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