Retail/Restaurants This is a view of the way the Bucket Shop Cafe has looked for years with awnings touting the bar/restaurant name.

Published on July 8th, 2015 |

0

Iconic Bucket Shop bar/restaurant to get spruced-up patio, signage

One of Buckhead’s oldest and longest running bar and restaurant, the Bucket Shop Cafe, is in the process of getting a newly paved and appointed outdoor patio, new signage and some interior upgrades as well.

This is a view of the way the Bucket Shop Cafe has looked for years with awnings touting the bar/restaurant name.

This is a view of the way the Bucket Shop Cafe has looked for years with awnings touting the bar/restaurant name.

Almost a year to the day after HighBrook Investment Management presented its plans to give a new face and interior to the One Live Oak office building, at 3475 Lenox Road N.E. in Buckhead, it returned to the SPI-12 Development Review Committee Wednesday with plans to redo the patio and signage for the Bucket Shop.

HighBrook Investment Management acquired title in January 2014 to the One Live Oak and is now in the final stages of a total interior and exterior renovation of the 1980s building and repositioning it with a new name, Live Oak Square. (To read that earlier story, click here.)

That work was part of a presentation the HighBrook team made to the Development Review Committee of SPI-12 (Special Public Interest District) in July of 2014. Part of the team was back Wednesday before the DRC with changes specifically to the Bucket Shop patio and signage.

This is a rendering of the proposed signage at the entrance to the patio dining area of the Bucket Shop.

This is a rendering of the proposed signage at the entrance to the patio dining area of the Bucket Shop.

The HighBrook plan from the beginning was to take the 10-story, 200,417-square-foot building they described as “drab….not touched since it was built,” from a B to an A office building,”

Janine Powell, with HighBrook Management, told the DRC members Wednesday most of the originally planned work is done and will be “ready to be viewed on July 15.” But she was there to get approval for a final element of the work—that being to the Bucket Shop.

Powell said the concrete on the street-front patio needs to be replaced, because it has some tripping issues at present, and signage for the bar/restaurant needs to be enhanced, especially since the only signage visible from the street is on a series of awnings that are being removed.

This is a photo of construction work already underway on the Bucket Shop sign's structure that was part of the presentation on Wednesday to the DRC.

This is a photo of construction work already underway on the Bucket Shop sign’s structure that was part of the presentation on Wednesday to the DRC.

She met with the committee, along with project manager Shamika Crouch, Judy Davis who works with Humphrey Construction getting permits, and Steve Bridges representing the sign company.

Although the DRC does not actually have any authority over the style of signs, it does have purview over the number and placement of what are called “monument signs” for building in the SPI-12 district. It was determined that HighBrook had already reached its maximum on monument signs (two) with the redesign work that started after last year’s meeting.

A lengthy discussion came up, however, as to whether the sign being proposed for the opening to the Bucket Shop patio entrance was simply a construction piece or a monument sign, because it will be located 23 feet from the façade of the building and actually located in the supplemental zone.

Both the HighBrook team and the DRC members agreed that since the awnings bearing the bar/restaurant name are being removed, and no other

This is a photo of the One Live Oak building prior to the exterior renovations that are now completed.

This is a photo of the One Live Oak building prior to the exterior renovations that are now completed.

signage for the Bucket Shop is visible from the street, that there is a need to find a way to define the Bucket Shop entrance from the sidewalk.

The major concern of committee members, however, was in not setting a precedent that could then come up again in future cases before the committee.

In the end, Livable Buckhead Executive Director Denise Starling, who essentially chairs the DRC meetings, found a description in the SPI-12 ordinance that the committee agreed fit the proposed Bucket Shop sign: “An architecturally articulated pedestrian entranceway.”

DRC member Peter Davis, who was one person most concerned about making sure the signage could not be defined as a monument sign, said of the resolution, “We need to make it clear that we are supportive of businesses having attractive signage, which conforms with the sign ordinance, on the sidewalk frontage of their outdoor patios.”

Speaking about the work that has already been done to the One Live Oak building, Davis added, “The building now comes alive.”

By the way, the Bucket Shop is slated to continue there in that location until 2025.

Print Friendly

Be Sociable, Share!


    About the Author



    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    Back to Top ↑
    • Grab BuckheadView!

    • Follow Us

       

    • Visit Our Other Publications

    • Ad
    • Ad

    • BuckheadGuidebook