Buckhead History The Christian Church of Buckhead now sits on the 2.3 acre site at the corner of Peachtree and Stratford roads.

Published on June 15th, 2015 |

2

Buckhead Heritage laments losing Peachtree Rd. period architecture

Buckhead Heritage’s executive director has voiced concern over the loss of important modern architectural buildings along Peachtree Road in Buckhead to new construction that will replace a

Above is a partial rendering of what is proposed by Reliant Group to reploace the Christian Church of Buckhead.

Above is a partial rendering of what is proposed by Related Group to replace the Christian Church of Buckhead, which is shown above in a black and white photo.

Christian Church and a 1950s-era multi-family residential complex.

In May, Miami-based developer Related Group presented plans to the Development Review Committee of SPI-12 for a 386-unit tower at the corner of Peachtree and Stratford roads (3372 Peachtree Road) that would raze the Christian Church of Buckhead.

Completed in 1986 as the Second Church of Christ, Scientist, the church complex exemplifies the Brutalist style in form and materials. It was designed by New York-born, Atlanta-based architect Joseph Amisano of the firm Toombs, Amisano & Wells.

This is a photo of the present 47-unit, condo building that was built on the Peachtreer Road  site in 1955.

This is a photo of the present 47-unit, condo building that was built on the Peachtree Road site in 1955.

Meanwhile, Atlanta developer JPX Works, LLC plans to raze the condominium complex at 2520 Peachtree Road NW and replace it with a 22-story condo building. Built in 1955, the low-rise complex was designed by architect James C. Wise, a graduate of Georgia Tech. The design includes elements of the International and New Formalism styles popular in post-WWII Atlanta.

“Buckhead Heritage laments the potential demolition of these two important modern architectural works along Peachtree Road,” Buckhead Heritage Executive Director Erica Danylchak wrote.

The front entrance to the 2520 Peachtree Road condo complex built in 1955.

The front entrance to the 2520 Peachtree Road condo complex built in 1955.

“The Christian Church is an iconic work by one of Atlanta’s Modernist masters. Meanwhile, the 2520 Peachtree Road complex represents the prevalent design aesthetic of 1950s Atlanta, an aesthetic shaped and disseminated by graduates of the architectural program at Georgia Tech,” she explained.

In 2014, the Atlanta Regional Commission completed an architectural survey of Buckhead’s Modern Resources (1940-1990) along the Peachtree Road corridor within the Buckhead boundaries, from Brookwood to the City of Atlanta limits. The survey identified 80 architectural resources for the study period.

The survey noted, “Particularly after World War II, Atlanta was moving away from the classical architectural influence that had dominated much of its history. During this time, Atlanta was positioning itself to become a city of national prominence, and would later continue a step further to define itself as an international city. The new modern architecture along Peachtree reflected the ambition of the age.”

Danylchak wrote, “We know from the recently conducted ARC survey that Buckhead’s Peachtree Road has an important collection of modern architecture, one of the heaviest concentrations of modern style buildings in the City of Atlanta. Many of these buildings are significant examples of the work of a generation of Atlanta architects,” she added.

“We will be reaching out to the developers of these two impending Peachtree Road projects to request thorough documentation of the work that is being lost so that we have a better understanding of this era of our architectural history. We look forward to their reply,” Danylchak stated.

Print Friendly

Be Sociable, Share!


    About the Author



    2 Responses to Buckhead Heritage laments losing Peachtree Rd. period architecture

    1. haywoodjarehmee says:

      these preservation efforts are sadly misplaced.

    2. Prisca says:

      Preservation should extend to all well-designed buildings, especially those designed by well-known architects. The Christian Church of Buckhead is a very sad example. Incorporating fine existing buildings into the design of large apartment blocks would add a lot to the “curb appeal” of these soulless buildings.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    Back to Top ↑
    • Grab BuckheadView!

    • Follow Us

       

    • Visit Our Other Publications

    • Ad
    • Ad

    • BuckheadGuidebook